• Julian Koch
  • Silvan Gantenbein
  • Kunal Masania
  • Wendelin J. Stark
  • Yaniv Erlich
  • Robert N. Grass

DNA storage offers substantial information density1–7 and exceptional half-life3. We devised a ‘DNA-of-things’ (DoT) storage architecture to produce materials with immutable memory. In a DoT framework, DNA molecules record the data, and these molecules are then encapsulated in nanometer silica beads8, which are fused into various materials that are used to print or cast objects in any shape. First, we applied DoT to three-dimensionally print a Stanford Bunny9 that contained a 45 kB digital DNA blueprint for its synthesis. We synthesized five generations of the bunny, each from the memory of the previous generation without additional DNA synthesis or degradation of information. To test the scalability of DoT, we stored a 1.4 MB video in DNA in plexiglass spectacle lenses and retrieved it by excising a tiny piece of the plexiglass and sequencing the embedded DNA. DoT could be applied to store electronic health records in medical implants, to hide data in everyday objects (steganography) and to manufacture objects containing their own blueprint. It may also facilitate the development of self-replicating machines.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)39-43
Number of pages5
JournalNature Biotechnology
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020
Externally publishedYes

ID: 69714127