The use of bolted connections between the tower and a support structure of an offshore wind turbine has created the need for a method to detect whether a monopile foundation plastically deforms during the installation procedure. Small permanent deformations are undesirable, not only because they can accelerate fatigue of the structure; but also because they can lead to misalignment between the tower and the foundation. Since direct measurements at the pile head are difficult to perform, a method based on non-collocated strain measurements is highly desirable. This paper proposes such a method. First, a physically non-linear one-dimensional model is proposed, which accounts for wave dispersion, effects that are relevant for large-diameter piles currently used by the industry. The proposed model, combined with an energy balance principle, gives an upper bound for the amount of plastic deformation caused by an impact load based on simple strain measurements. This is verified by a lab-scale experiment with a uni-axial stress state. Second, measurement data collected during pile driving of a large-diameter pile show that the proposed one-dimensional model, while able to predict the peak stresses, fails to accurately predict the full time history of the measured stress state. In contrast, an advanced model based on shell membrane theory is able to do that, showing that a bi-axial stress state is needed for these type of structures. This requires an extension of the theory for plasticity quantification presented in this paper.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Mechanical Sciences
Volume148
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2018

    Research areas

  • Impact pile driving, Plastic deformation, Wave dispersion

ID: 46630002