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Boundary Layer Clouds and Convection over Subtropical Oceans in our Current and in a Warmer Climate. / Nuijens, Louise; Siebesma, A. Pier.

In: Current Climate Change Reports, Vol. 5, No. 2, 2019, p. 80-94.

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@article{f2fe428ff5ba42caa27b016c2f1e5866,
title = "Boundary Layer Clouds and Convection over Subtropical Oceans in our Current and in a Warmer Climate",
abstract = "Purpose of Review: We review our understanding of mechanisms underlying the response of (sub)tropical clouds to global warming, highlight mechanisms that challenge our understanding, and discuss simulation strategies that tackle them. Recent Findings: Turbulence-resolving models and emergent constraints provide probable evidence, supported by theoretical understanding, that the cooling cloud radiative effect (CRE) of low clouds weakens with warming: a positive low-cloud feedback. Nevertheless, an uncertainty in the feedback remains. Climate models may not adequately represent changing SST and circulation patterns, which determine future cloud-controlling factors and how these couple to clouds. Furthermore, we do not understand what mesoscale organization implies for the CRE, and how moisture-radiation interactions, horizontal advection, and the profile of wind regulate low cloud, in our current and in our warmer climate. Summary: Clouds in nature are more complex than the idealized cloud types that have informed our understanding of the cloud feedback. Remaining major uncertainties are the coupling of clouds to large-scale circulations and to the ocean, and mesoscale aggregation of clouds.",
keywords = "Atmosphere-ocean coupling, Cloud-circulation coupling, Emergent constraints, Low-cloud feedback, Mesoscale aggregation, Moisture-radiation interactions, Turbulence-resolving models",
author = "Louise Nuijens and Siebesma, {A. Pier}",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1007/s40641-019-00126-x",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
pages = "80--94",
journal = "Current Climate Change Reports",
issn = "2198-6061",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Boundary Layer Clouds and Convection over Subtropical Oceans in our Current and in a Warmer Climate

AU - Nuijens, Louise

AU - Siebesma, A. Pier

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Purpose of Review: We review our understanding of mechanisms underlying the response of (sub)tropical clouds to global warming, highlight mechanisms that challenge our understanding, and discuss simulation strategies that tackle them. Recent Findings: Turbulence-resolving models and emergent constraints provide probable evidence, supported by theoretical understanding, that the cooling cloud radiative effect (CRE) of low clouds weakens with warming: a positive low-cloud feedback. Nevertheless, an uncertainty in the feedback remains. Climate models may not adequately represent changing SST and circulation patterns, which determine future cloud-controlling factors and how these couple to clouds. Furthermore, we do not understand what mesoscale organization implies for the CRE, and how moisture-radiation interactions, horizontal advection, and the profile of wind regulate low cloud, in our current and in our warmer climate. Summary: Clouds in nature are more complex than the idealized cloud types that have informed our understanding of the cloud feedback. Remaining major uncertainties are the coupling of clouds to large-scale circulations and to the ocean, and mesoscale aggregation of clouds.

AB - Purpose of Review: We review our understanding of mechanisms underlying the response of (sub)tropical clouds to global warming, highlight mechanisms that challenge our understanding, and discuss simulation strategies that tackle them. Recent Findings: Turbulence-resolving models and emergent constraints provide probable evidence, supported by theoretical understanding, that the cooling cloud radiative effect (CRE) of low clouds weakens with warming: a positive low-cloud feedback. Nevertheless, an uncertainty in the feedback remains. Climate models may not adequately represent changing SST and circulation patterns, which determine future cloud-controlling factors and how these couple to clouds. Furthermore, we do not understand what mesoscale organization implies for the CRE, and how moisture-radiation interactions, horizontal advection, and the profile of wind regulate low cloud, in our current and in our warmer climate. Summary: Clouds in nature are more complex than the idealized cloud types that have informed our understanding of the cloud feedback. Remaining major uncertainties are the coupling of clouds to large-scale circulations and to the ocean, and mesoscale aggregation of clouds.

KW - Atmosphere-ocean coupling

KW - Cloud-circulation coupling

KW - Emergent constraints

KW - Low-cloud feedback

KW - Mesoscale aggregation

KW - Moisture-radiation interactions

KW - Turbulence-resolving models

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85065421570&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s40641-019-00126-x

DO - 10.1007/s40641-019-00126-x

M3 - Review article

VL - 5

SP - 80

EP - 94

JO - Current Climate Change Reports

T2 - Current Climate Change Reports

JF - Current Climate Change Reports

SN - 2198-6061

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 53937028