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Do attitudes cause behavior or vice versa? An alternative conceptualization of the attitude-behavior relationship in travel behavior modeling. / Kroesen, Maarten; Handy, Susan; Chorus, Caspar.

In: Transportation Research. Part A: Policy & Practice, Vol. 101, 01.07.2017, p. 190-202.

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@article{9fffd0d056c54ebc9a1a2935f9965a7f,
title = "Do attitudes cause behavior or vice versa? An alternative conceptualization of the attitude-behavior relationship in travel behavior modeling",
abstract = "Attitudes are thought to play an important role in determining people's travel behavior, although researchers have acknowledged the possibility of a reverse relationship. Given the importance of knowledge about the direction of causation as a basis for policies and programs designed to effect behavioral change, the scarcity of in-depth research on this subject is surprising and problematic. The aim of the present paper is twofold: first to assess the bidirectional relationships between attitudes and behavior (in a transport context) and second to present a new framework to study attitude-behavior (in)consistency over time. To achieve these aims, we use data from a two-wave mobility panel to estimate cross-lagged panel models and latent transition models. Results indicate that use of a mode and the attitude towards using that mode mutually influence each other over time. As expected, we find that people who have dissonant (i.e., non-aligned) attitude-behavior patterns are less stable than those who have consonant patterns. Contrary to conventional wisdom and commonly used model structures, however, the effects of behaviors on attitudes are much larger than vice versa. That is, dissonant travelers are more inclined to adjust their attitudes to align those with their behavior than vice versa. Based on these results, we outline several implications for research and policy.",
keywords = "Attitudes, Causality, Cross-lagged panel model, Latent transition model, Theory of Cognitive Dissonance, Travel behavior",
author = "Maarten Kroesen and Susan Handy and Caspar Chorus",
year = "2017",
month = jul,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.tra.2017.05.013",
language = "English",
volume = "101",
pages = "190--202",
journal = "Transportation Research. Part A: Policy & Practice",
issn = "0965-8564",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Do attitudes cause behavior or vice versa? An alternative conceptualization of the attitude-behavior relationship in travel behavior modeling

AU - Kroesen, Maarten

AU - Handy, Susan

AU - Chorus, Caspar

PY - 2017/7/1

Y1 - 2017/7/1

N2 - Attitudes are thought to play an important role in determining people's travel behavior, although researchers have acknowledged the possibility of a reverse relationship. Given the importance of knowledge about the direction of causation as a basis for policies and programs designed to effect behavioral change, the scarcity of in-depth research on this subject is surprising and problematic. The aim of the present paper is twofold: first to assess the bidirectional relationships between attitudes and behavior (in a transport context) and second to present a new framework to study attitude-behavior (in)consistency over time. To achieve these aims, we use data from a two-wave mobility panel to estimate cross-lagged panel models and latent transition models. Results indicate that use of a mode and the attitude towards using that mode mutually influence each other over time. As expected, we find that people who have dissonant (i.e., non-aligned) attitude-behavior patterns are less stable than those who have consonant patterns. Contrary to conventional wisdom and commonly used model structures, however, the effects of behaviors on attitudes are much larger than vice versa. That is, dissonant travelers are more inclined to adjust their attitudes to align those with their behavior than vice versa. Based on these results, we outline several implications for research and policy.

AB - Attitudes are thought to play an important role in determining people's travel behavior, although researchers have acknowledged the possibility of a reverse relationship. Given the importance of knowledge about the direction of causation as a basis for policies and programs designed to effect behavioral change, the scarcity of in-depth research on this subject is surprising and problematic. The aim of the present paper is twofold: first to assess the bidirectional relationships between attitudes and behavior (in a transport context) and second to present a new framework to study attitude-behavior (in)consistency over time. To achieve these aims, we use data from a two-wave mobility panel to estimate cross-lagged panel models and latent transition models. Results indicate that use of a mode and the attitude towards using that mode mutually influence each other over time. As expected, we find that people who have dissonant (i.e., non-aligned) attitude-behavior patterns are less stable than those who have consonant patterns. Contrary to conventional wisdom and commonly used model structures, however, the effects of behaviors on attitudes are much larger than vice versa. That is, dissonant travelers are more inclined to adjust their attitudes to align those with their behavior than vice versa. Based on these results, we outline several implications for research and policy.

KW - Attitudes

KW - Causality

KW - Cross-lagged panel model

KW - Latent transition model

KW - Theory of Cognitive Dissonance

KW - Travel behavior

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85019920202&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.tra.2017.05.013

DO - 10.1016/j.tra.2017.05.013

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85019920202

VL - 101

SP - 190

EP - 202

JO - Transportation Research. Part A: Policy & Practice

JF - Transportation Research. Part A: Policy & Practice

SN - 0965-8564

ER -

ID: 21360545