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How can Gamification Improve MOOC Student Engagement? / Khalil, Mohammad; Ebner, Martin; Admiraal, Wilfried.

The European Conference on Game Based Learning. 2017. p. 819-828.

Research output: Scientific - peer-reviewConference contribution

Harvard

Khalil, M, Ebner, M & Admiraal, W 2017, How can Gamification Improve MOOC Student Engagement? in The European Conference on Game Based Learning. pp. 819-828.

APA

Khalil, M., Ebner, M., & Admiraal, W. (2017). How can Gamification Improve MOOC Student Engagement? In The European Conference on Game Based Learning. (pp. 819-828)

Vancouver

Khalil M, Ebner M, Admiraal W. How can Gamification Improve MOOC Student Engagement? In The European Conference on Game Based Learning. 2017. p. 819-828.

Author

Khalil, Mohammad; Ebner, Martin; Admiraal, Wilfried / How can Gamification Improve MOOC Student Engagement?

The European Conference on Game Based Learning. 2017. p. 819-828.

Research output: Scientific - peer-reviewConference contribution

BibTeX

@inbook{4da4de73d7a44a81825d70569e12fff9,
title = "How can Gamification Improve MOOC Student Engagement?",
keywords = "gamificatio, dropout, moocs",
author = "Mohammad Khalil and Martin Ebner and Wilfried Admiraal",
year = "2017",
month = "10",
pages = "819--828",
booktitle = "The European Conference on Game Based Learning",

}

RIS

TY - CHAP

T1 - How can Gamification Improve MOOC Student Engagement?

AU - Khalil,Mohammad

AU - Ebner,Martin

AU - Admiraal,Wilfried

PY - 2017/10/4

Y1 - 2017/10/4

N2 - Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) require students’ motivation either intrinsically or extrinsically to complete any of its courses. Even though MOOCs enjoy great popularity and bring many benefits to the educational community, some concerns arise with MOOC advancement. In fact, MOOCs are affected by low completion rate and face issues with respect to interactivity and student engagement along MOOC duration, which may convert student excitement to boredom and then drop out at any stage. A key result of research in the past couple of years has proved that students’ engagement in MOOCs is strongly related to their activities online. These activities are related to the interaction between student and logging in the MOOC, reading and writing in the MOOC discussion forum, watching videos and doing quizzes. In this research paper, we present our research in deploying a gamification mechanic in MOOCs to increase student engagement. The gamification approach relies on weekly feedback to drive student intrinsic and extrinsic motivation. Following learning analytics on students’ data from a MOOC offered in 2014, 2015, and 2016, the outcome of this approach showed an obvious increase in students’ activity and engagement in discussion forums, login frequency and quiz trials. The active students’ cohort allotment has increased in comparison with previous versions of the same MOOC as well as the completion rate has incremented up to 26% of the total number of participants.

AB - Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) require students’ motivation either intrinsically or extrinsically to complete any of its courses. Even though MOOCs enjoy great popularity and bring many benefits to the educational community, some concerns arise with MOOC advancement. In fact, MOOCs are affected by low completion rate and face issues with respect to interactivity and student engagement along MOOC duration, which may convert student excitement to boredom and then drop out at any stage. A key result of research in the past couple of years has proved that students’ engagement in MOOCs is strongly related to their activities online. These activities are related to the interaction between student and logging in the MOOC, reading and writing in the MOOC discussion forum, watching videos and doing quizzes. In this research paper, we present our research in deploying a gamification mechanic in MOOCs to increase student engagement. The gamification approach relies on weekly feedback to drive student intrinsic and extrinsic motivation. Following learning analytics on students’ data from a MOOC offered in 2014, 2015, and 2016, the outcome of this approach showed an obvious increase in students’ activity and engagement in discussion forums, login frequency and quiz trials. The active students’ cohort allotment has increased in comparison with previous versions of the same MOOC as well as the completion rate has incremented up to 26% of the total number of participants.

KW - gamificatio

KW - dropout

KW - moocs

M3 - Conference contribution

SP - 819

EP - 828

BT - The European Conference on Game Based Learning

ER -

ID: 29932514