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Linking Cohesion Policy and Citizens’ Identification with the EU in Regions : Between Opportunism and Euroscepticism in the Netherlands. / Fernandez Maldonado, Ana Maria; Spaans, Marjolein; Dabrowski, Marcin; Rocco, Roberto.

Annual Conference Regional Studies Association 2018: A Leading and Impactful Community. 2018.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionScientific

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Fernandez Maldonado, AM, Spaans, M, Dabrowski, M & Rocco, R 2018, Linking Cohesion Policy and Citizens’ Identification with the EU in Regions: Between Opportunism and Euroscepticism in the Netherlands. in Annual Conference Regional Studies Association 2018: A Leading and Impactful Community. Annual Conference of the Regional Studies Association (RSA), Lugano, Switzerland, 3/06/18.

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BibTeX

@inproceedings{4d26eecf8f534e499569b8f45d7cc2cd,
title = "Linking Cohesion Policy and Citizens’ Identification with the EU in Regions: Between Opportunism and Euroscepticism in the Netherlands",
abstract = "Cohesion Policy being the EU’s policy, bringing investment funds to European regions, has arguably the most tangible impacts on the citizens’ environment and livelihoods. One could thus expect that it has a significant positive impact on the ways in which citizens perceive the EU. But does it? How does the regional context affect this linkage between the use of European funding for regional development and the identification with the EU? This paper brings an element of response to this question through study of two Dutch regions -Flevoland and Limburg - conducted as part of the Horizon 2020 COHESIFY project (Grant Agreement no 693427). The first used to be a substantial receiver of Structural Funds, but today finds itself marginalised in the stream of EU funding, while the latter is at the heart of a cross-border area with deeply embedded cooperation long-supported by Cohesion Policy. Although citizens in both regions show attachment to the EU, the perception of how the EU works tends to be negative. To what extent are those views related to the ways in which EU Cohesion Policy has been implemented in those regions? Drawing on interviews with the key policy stakeholders, surveys and focus groups with citizens, the paper explores this question and sheds light on the capacity of Cohesion Policy to mobilise positive European identification from the perspective of a country that is a net contributor to EU budget.",
author = "{Fernandez Maldonado}, {Ana Maria} and Marjolein Spaans and Marcin Dabrowski and Roberto Rocco",
year = "2018",
language = "English",
booktitle = "Annual Conference Regional Studies Association 2018",

}

RIS

TY - GEN

T1 - Linking Cohesion Policy and Citizens’ Identification with the EU in Regions

T2 - Between Opportunism and Euroscepticism in the Netherlands

AU - Fernandez Maldonado, Ana Maria

AU - Spaans, Marjolein

AU - Dabrowski, Marcin

AU - Rocco, Roberto

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Cohesion Policy being the EU’s policy, bringing investment funds to European regions, has arguably the most tangible impacts on the citizens’ environment and livelihoods. One could thus expect that it has a significant positive impact on the ways in which citizens perceive the EU. But does it? How does the regional context affect this linkage between the use of European funding for regional development and the identification with the EU? This paper brings an element of response to this question through study of two Dutch regions -Flevoland and Limburg - conducted as part of the Horizon 2020 COHESIFY project (Grant Agreement no 693427). The first used to be a substantial receiver of Structural Funds, but today finds itself marginalised in the stream of EU funding, while the latter is at the heart of a cross-border area with deeply embedded cooperation long-supported by Cohesion Policy. Although citizens in both regions show attachment to the EU, the perception of how the EU works tends to be negative. To what extent are those views related to the ways in which EU Cohesion Policy has been implemented in those regions? Drawing on interviews with the key policy stakeholders, surveys and focus groups with citizens, the paper explores this question and sheds light on the capacity of Cohesion Policy to mobilise positive European identification from the perspective of a country that is a net contributor to EU budget.

AB - Cohesion Policy being the EU’s policy, bringing investment funds to European regions, has arguably the most tangible impacts on the citizens’ environment and livelihoods. One could thus expect that it has a significant positive impact on the ways in which citizens perceive the EU. But does it? How does the regional context affect this linkage between the use of European funding for regional development and the identification with the EU? This paper brings an element of response to this question through study of two Dutch regions -Flevoland and Limburg - conducted as part of the Horizon 2020 COHESIFY project (Grant Agreement no 693427). The first used to be a substantial receiver of Structural Funds, but today finds itself marginalised in the stream of EU funding, while the latter is at the heart of a cross-border area with deeply embedded cooperation long-supported by Cohesion Policy. Although citizens in both regions show attachment to the EU, the perception of how the EU works tends to be negative. To what extent are those views related to the ways in which EU Cohesion Policy has been implemented in those regions? Drawing on interviews with the key policy stakeholders, surveys and focus groups with citizens, the paper explores this question and sheds light on the capacity of Cohesion Policy to mobilise positive European identification from the perspective of a country that is a net contributor to EU budget.

M3 - Conference contribution

BT - Annual Conference Regional Studies Association 2018

ER -

ID: 51427534