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Long-term bar dynamics using satellite imagery : A case study at Anmok beach, South Korea. / Athanasiou, Panagiotis; de Boer, Wiebe; Tonnon, Pieter Koen; Yoo, Jeseon; de Schipper, Matthieu; de Vries, Sierd; Ranasinghe, Roshanka; Reniers, Ad.

In: Proceedings of the Coastal Engineering Conference, Vol. 36, No. 2018, 2018.

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Harvard

Athanasiou, P, de Boer, W, Tonnon, PK, Yoo, J, de Schipper, M, de Vries, S, Ranasinghe, R & Reniers, A 2018, 'Long-term bar dynamics using satellite imagery: A case study at Anmok beach, South Korea' Proceedings of the Coastal Engineering Conference, vol. 36, no. 2018. https://doi.org/10.9753/icce.v36.sediment.91

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Vancouver

Author

Athanasiou, Panagiotis ; de Boer, Wiebe ; Tonnon, Pieter Koen ; Yoo, Jeseon ; de Schipper, Matthieu ; de Vries, Sierd ; Ranasinghe, Roshanka ; Reniers, Ad. / Long-term bar dynamics using satellite imagery : A case study at Anmok beach, South Korea. In: Proceedings of the Coastal Engineering Conference. 2018 ; Vol. 36, No. 2018.

BibTeX

@article{51796f78a6c442799c38ba585d9e556b,
title = "Long-term bar dynamics using satellite imagery: A case study at Anmok beach, South Korea",
abstract = "Nearshore sandbar patterns can affect the hydrodynamics and, as a result, the beach morphodynamics in the nearshore zone. Hence, spatial and temporal variability in the sandbars can influence beach accretion and erosion. Understanding the variability of the sandbar system can therefore be crucial for informed coastal zone management. So far, the methods to study sandbar dynamics mainly include datasets of video observations or occasional bathymetric surveys. However, at most locations around the world, these types of data are not or only scarcely available. In this paper we present an alternative method to analyze long-term sandbar variability by means of freely available satellite imagery. These images are globally available since the 1980’s and, thus, have the potential to be applicable at any location in the world. Here, we will illustrate the methodology by means of a case study at Anmok beach at the South Korean East coast.",
author = "Panagiotis Athanasiou and {de Boer}, Wiebe and Tonnon, {Pieter Koen} and Jeseon Yoo and {de Schipper}, Matthieu and {de Vries}, Sierd and Roshanka Ranasinghe and Ad Reniers",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.9753/icce.v36.sediment.91",
language = "English",
volume = "36",
journal = "Proceedings of the Coastal Engineering Conference",
issn = "0161-3782",
number = "2018",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Long-term bar dynamics using satellite imagery

T2 - Proceedings of the Coastal Engineering Conference

AU - Athanasiou, Panagiotis

AU - de Boer, Wiebe

AU - Tonnon, Pieter Koen

AU - Yoo, Jeseon

AU - de Schipper, Matthieu

AU - de Vries, Sierd

AU - Ranasinghe, Roshanka

AU - Reniers, Ad

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Nearshore sandbar patterns can affect the hydrodynamics and, as a result, the beach morphodynamics in the nearshore zone. Hence, spatial and temporal variability in the sandbars can influence beach accretion and erosion. Understanding the variability of the sandbar system can therefore be crucial for informed coastal zone management. So far, the methods to study sandbar dynamics mainly include datasets of video observations or occasional bathymetric surveys. However, at most locations around the world, these types of data are not or only scarcely available. In this paper we present an alternative method to analyze long-term sandbar variability by means of freely available satellite imagery. These images are globally available since the 1980’s and, thus, have the potential to be applicable at any location in the world. Here, we will illustrate the methodology by means of a case study at Anmok beach at the South Korean East coast.

AB - Nearshore sandbar patterns can affect the hydrodynamics and, as a result, the beach morphodynamics in the nearshore zone. Hence, spatial and temporal variability in the sandbars can influence beach accretion and erosion. Understanding the variability of the sandbar system can therefore be crucial for informed coastal zone management. So far, the methods to study sandbar dynamics mainly include datasets of video observations or occasional bathymetric surveys. However, at most locations around the world, these types of data are not or only scarcely available. In this paper we present an alternative method to analyze long-term sandbar variability by means of freely available satellite imagery. These images are globally available since the 1980’s and, thus, have the potential to be applicable at any location in the world. Here, we will illustrate the methodology by means of a case study at Anmok beach at the South Korean East coast.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85074065198&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.9753/icce.v36.sediment.91

DO - 10.9753/icce.v36.sediment.91

M3 - Conference article

VL - 36

JO - Proceedings of the Coastal Engineering Conference

JF - Proceedings of the Coastal Engineering Conference

SN - 0161-3782

IS - 2018

ER -

ID: 62826038