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Long-term morphological developments of river channels separated by a longitudinal training wall. / Le, Binh; Crosato, Alessandra; Uijttewaal, Wim.

In: Advances in Water Resources, Vol. 113, 2018, p. 73-85.

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@article{c7c7911e40164cbf8683704ade849f01,
title = "Long-term morphological developments of river channels separated by a longitudinal training wall",
abstract = "Rivers have been trained for centuries by channel narrowing and straightening. This caused important damages to their ecosystems, particularly around the bank areas. We analyse here the possibility to train rivers in a new way by subdividing their channel in main and ecological channel with a longitudinal training wall. The effectiveness of longitudinal training walls in achieving this goal and their long-term effects on the river morphology have not been thoroughly investigated yet. In particular, studies that assess the stability of the two parallel channels separated by the training wall are still lacking. This work studies the long-term morphological developments of river channels subdivided by a longitudinal training wall in the presence of steady alternate bars. This type of bars, common in alluvial rivers, alters the flow field and the sediment transport direction and might affect the stability of the bifurcating system. The work comprises both laboratory experiments and numerical simulations (Delft3D). The results show that a system of parallel channels divided by a longitudinal training wall has the tendency to become unstable. An important factor is found to be the location of the upstream termination of the longitudinal wall with respect to a neighboring steady bar. The relative widths of the two parallel channels separated by the wall and variable discharge do not substantially change the final evolution of the system.",
keywords = "Longitudinal training wall, River morphology, River bars, Channel stability, Delft3D, Laboratory experiments",
author = "Binh Le and Alessandra Crosato and Wim Uijttewaal",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1016/j.advwatres.2018.01.007",
language = "English",
volume = "113",
pages = "73--85",
journal = "Advances in Water Resources",
issn = "0309-1708",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Long-term morphological developments of river channels separated by a longitudinal training wall

AU - Le, Binh

AU - Crosato, Alessandra

AU - Uijttewaal, Wim

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Rivers have been trained for centuries by channel narrowing and straightening. This caused important damages to their ecosystems, particularly around the bank areas. We analyse here the possibility to train rivers in a new way by subdividing their channel in main and ecological channel with a longitudinal training wall. The effectiveness of longitudinal training walls in achieving this goal and their long-term effects on the river morphology have not been thoroughly investigated yet. In particular, studies that assess the stability of the two parallel channels separated by the training wall are still lacking. This work studies the long-term morphological developments of river channels subdivided by a longitudinal training wall in the presence of steady alternate bars. This type of bars, common in alluvial rivers, alters the flow field and the sediment transport direction and might affect the stability of the bifurcating system. The work comprises both laboratory experiments and numerical simulations (Delft3D). The results show that a system of parallel channels divided by a longitudinal training wall has the tendency to become unstable. An important factor is found to be the location of the upstream termination of the longitudinal wall with respect to a neighboring steady bar. The relative widths of the two parallel channels separated by the wall and variable discharge do not substantially change the final evolution of the system.

AB - Rivers have been trained for centuries by channel narrowing and straightening. This caused important damages to their ecosystems, particularly around the bank areas. We analyse here the possibility to train rivers in a new way by subdividing their channel in main and ecological channel with a longitudinal training wall. The effectiveness of longitudinal training walls in achieving this goal and their long-term effects on the river morphology have not been thoroughly investigated yet. In particular, studies that assess the stability of the two parallel channels separated by the training wall are still lacking. This work studies the long-term morphological developments of river channels subdivided by a longitudinal training wall in the presence of steady alternate bars. This type of bars, common in alluvial rivers, alters the flow field and the sediment transport direction and might affect the stability of the bifurcating system. The work comprises both laboratory experiments and numerical simulations (Delft3D). The results show that a system of parallel channels divided by a longitudinal training wall has the tendency to become unstable. An important factor is found to be the location of the upstream termination of the longitudinal wall with respect to a neighboring steady bar. The relative widths of the two parallel channels separated by the wall and variable discharge do not substantially change the final evolution of the system.

KW - Longitudinal training wall

KW - River morphology

KW - River bars

KW - Channel stability

KW - Delft3D

KW - Laboratory experiments

UR - http://resolver.tudelft.nl/uuid:c7c7911e-4016-4cbf-8683-704ade849f01

U2 - 10.1016/j.advwatres.2018.01.007

DO - 10.1016/j.advwatres.2018.01.007

M3 - Article

VL - 113

SP - 73

EP - 85

JO - Advances in Water Resources

JF - Advances in Water Resources

SN - 0309-1708

ER -

ID: 36909634