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On-chip density-based purification of liposomes. / Deshpande, Siddharth; Birnie, A.T.F.; Dekker, Cees.

In: Biomicrofluidics, Vol. 11, No. 3, 034106, 01.05.2017, p. 1-13.

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@article{383c46160fb64313a49f7182557a61e5,
title = "On-chip density-based purification of liposomes",
abstract = "Due to their cell membrane-mimicking properties, liposomes have served as a versatile research tool in science, from membrane biophysics and drug delivery systems to bottom-up synthetic cells. We recently reported a novel microfluidic method, Octanol-assisted Liposome Assembly (OLA), to form cell-sized, monodisperse, unilamellar liposomes with excellent encapsulation efficiency. Although OLA provides crucial advantages over alternative methods, it suffers from the presence of 1-octanol droplets, an inevitable by-product of the production process. These droplets can adversely affect the system regarding liposome stability, channel clogging, and imaging quality. In this paper, we report a density-based technique to separate the liposomes from droplets, integrated on the same chip. We show that this method can yield highly pure (>95{\%}) liposome samples. We also present data showing that a variety of other separation techniques (based on size or relative permittivity) were unsuccessful. Our density-based separation approach favourably decouples the production and separation module, thus allowing freshly prepared liposomes to be used for downstream on-chip experimentation. This simple separation technique will make OLA a more versatile and widely applicable tool.",
author = "Siddharth Deshpande and A.T.F. Birnie and Cees Dekker",
year = "2017",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1063/1.4983174",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "1--13",
journal = "Biomicrofluidics",
issn = "1932-1058",
publisher = "American Institute of Physics Publising LLC",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - On-chip density-based purification of liposomes

AU - Deshpande, Siddharth

AU - Birnie, A.T.F.

AU - Dekker, Cees

PY - 2017/5/1

Y1 - 2017/5/1

N2 - Due to their cell membrane-mimicking properties, liposomes have served as a versatile research tool in science, from membrane biophysics and drug delivery systems to bottom-up synthetic cells. We recently reported a novel microfluidic method, Octanol-assisted Liposome Assembly (OLA), to form cell-sized, monodisperse, unilamellar liposomes with excellent encapsulation efficiency. Although OLA provides crucial advantages over alternative methods, it suffers from the presence of 1-octanol droplets, an inevitable by-product of the production process. These droplets can adversely affect the system regarding liposome stability, channel clogging, and imaging quality. In this paper, we report a density-based technique to separate the liposomes from droplets, integrated on the same chip. We show that this method can yield highly pure (>95%) liposome samples. We also present data showing that a variety of other separation techniques (based on size or relative permittivity) were unsuccessful. Our density-based separation approach favourably decouples the production and separation module, thus allowing freshly prepared liposomes to be used for downstream on-chip experimentation. This simple separation technique will make OLA a more versatile and widely applicable tool.

AB - Due to their cell membrane-mimicking properties, liposomes have served as a versatile research tool in science, from membrane biophysics and drug delivery systems to bottom-up synthetic cells. We recently reported a novel microfluidic method, Octanol-assisted Liposome Assembly (OLA), to form cell-sized, monodisperse, unilamellar liposomes with excellent encapsulation efficiency. Although OLA provides crucial advantages over alternative methods, it suffers from the presence of 1-octanol droplets, an inevitable by-product of the production process. These droplets can adversely affect the system regarding liposome stability, channel clogging, and imaging quality. In this paper, we report a density-based technique to separate the liposomes from droplets, integrated on the same chip. We show that this method can yield highly pure (>95%) liposome samples. We also present data showing that a variety of other separation techniques (based on size or relative permittivity) were unsuccessful. Our density-based separation approach favourably decouples the production and separation module, thus allowing freshly prepared liposomes to be used for downstream on-chip experimentation. This simple separation technique will make OLA a more versatile and widely applicable tool.

UR - http://resolver.tudelft.nl/uuid:383c4616-0fb6-4313-a49f-7182557a61e5

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85019076323&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1063/1.4983174

DO - 10.1063/1.4983174

M3 - Article

VL - 11

SP - 1

EP - 13

JO - Biomicrofluidics

T2 - Biomicrofluidics

JF - Biomicrofluidics

SN - 1932-1058

IS - 3

M1 - 034106

ER -

ID: 33977460