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Potential impacts of changing supply-water quality on drinking water distribution : A review. / Liu, Gang; Zhang, Ya; Knibbe, Willem Jan; Feng, Cuijie; Liu, Wentso; Medema, Gertjan; van der Meer, Walter.

In: Water Research, Vol. 116, 01.06.2017, p. 135-148.

Research output: Scientific - peer-reviewReview article

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Liu G, Zhang Y, Knibbe WJ, Feng C, Liu W, Medema G et al. Potential impacts of changing supply-water quality on drinking water distribution: A review. Water Research. 2017 Jun 1;116:135-148. Available from, DOI: 10.1016/j.watres.2017.03.031

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BibTeX

@article{a06ac2ba4f8e4ab780be2a6e370eb1dd,
title = "Potential impacts of changing supply-water quality on drinking water distribution: A review",
abstract = "Driven by the development of water purification technologies and water quality regulations, the use of better source water and/or upgraded water treatment processes to improve drinking water quality have become common practices worldwide. However, even though these elements lead to improved water quality, the water quality may be impacted during its distribution through piped networks due to the processes such as pipe material release, biofilm formation and detachment, accumulation and resuspension of loose deposits. Irregular changes in supply-water quality may cause physiochemical and microbiological de-stabilization of pipe material, biofilms and loose deposits in the distribution system that have been established over decades and may harbor components that cause health or esthetical issues (brown water). Even though it is clearly relevant to customers’ health (e.g., recent Flint water crisis), until now, switching of supply-water quality is done without any systematic evaluation. This article reviews the contaminants that develop in the water distribution system and their characteristics, as well as the possible transition effects during the switching of treated water quality by destabilization and the release of pipe material and contaminants into the water and the subsequent risks. At the end of this article, a framework is proposed for the evaluation of potential transition effects.",
keywords = "Destabilization, Drinking water distribution, Evaluation framework, Transition effects, Water quality switching",
author = "Gang Liu and Ya Zhang and Knibbe, {Willem Jan} and Cuijie Feng and Wentso Liu and Gertjan Medema and {van der Meer}, Walter",
year = "2017",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1016/j.watres.2017.03.031",
volume = "116",
pages = "135--148",
journal = "Water Research",
issn = "0043-1354",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Potential impacts of changing supply-water quality on drinking water distribution

T2 - Water Research

AU - Liu,Gang

AU - Zhang,Ya

AU - Knibbe,Willem Jan

AU - Feng,Cuijie

AU - Liu,Wentso

AU - Medema,Gertjan

AU - van der Meer,Walter

PY - 2017/6/1

Y1 - 2017/6/1

N2 - Driven by the development of water purification technologies and water quality regulations, the use of better source water and/or upgraded water treatment processes to improve drinking water quality have become common practices worldwide. However, even though these elements lead to improved water quality, the water quality may be impacted during its distribution through piped networks due to the processes such as pipe material release, biofilm formation and detachment, accumulation and resuspension of loose deposits. Irregular changes in supply-water quality may cause physiochemical and microbiological de-stabilization of pipe material, biofilms and loose deposits in the distribution system that have been established over decades and may harbor components that cause health or esthetical issues (brown water). Even though it is clearly relevant to customers’ health (e.g., recent Flint water crisis), until now, switching of supply-water quality is done without any systematic evaluation. This article reviews the contaminants that develop in the water distribution system and their characteristics, as well as the possible transition effects during the switching of treated water quality by destabilization and the release of pipe material and contaminants into the water and the subsequent risks. At the end of this article, a framework is proposed for the evaluation of potential transition effects.

AB - Driven by the development of water purification technologies and water quality regulations, the use of better source water and/or upgraded water treatment processes to improve drinking water quality have become common practices worldwide. However, even though these elements lead to improved water quality, the water quality may be impacted during its distribution through piped networks due to the processes such as pipe material release, biofilm formation and detachment, accumulation and resuspension of loose deposits. Irregular changes in supply-water quality may cause physiochemical and microbiological de-stabilization of pipe material, biofilms and loose deposits in the distribution system that have been established over decades and may harbor components that cause health or esthetical issues (brown water). Even though it is clearly relevant to customers’ health (e.g., recent Flint water crisis), until now, switching of supply-water quality is done without any systematic evaluation. This article reviews the contaminants that develop in the water distribution system and their characteristics, as well as the possible transition effects during the switching of treated water quality by destabilization and the release of pipe material and contaminants into the water and the subsequent risks. At the end of this article, a framework is proposed for the evaluation of potential transition effects.

KW - Destabilization

KW - Drinking water distribution

KW - Evaluation framework

KW - Transition effects

KW - Water quality switching

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85015375330&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.watres.2017.03.031

DO - 10.1016/j.watres.2017.03.031

M3 - Review article

VL - 116

SP - 135

EP - 148

JO - Water Research

JF - Water Research

SN - 0043-1354

ER -

ID: 19759825