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The Use of Persuasive In-Car Technology to Persuade Drivers at the Tactical Level. / van Gent, Paul; Farah, Haneen; Nes, Nicole Van; van Arem, Bart.

Proceedings of the Road Safety and Simulation Conference: 17-19 October 2017, The Hague, Netherlands. 2017. 285.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionScientificpeer-review

Harvard

van Gent, P, Farah, H, Nes, NV & van Arem, B 2017, The Use of Persuasive In-Car Technology to Persuade Drivers at the Tactical Level. in Proceedings of the Road Safety and Simulation Conference: 17-19 October 2017, The Hague, Netherlands., 285, RSS2017: Road Safety and Simulation International Conference 2017, The Hague, Netherlands, 17/10/17.

APA

van Gent, P., Farah, H., Nes, N. V., & van Arem, B. (2017). The Use of Persuasive In-Car Technology to Persuade Drivers at the Tactical Level. In Proceedings of the Road Safety and Simulation Conference: 17-19 October 2017, The Hague, Netherlands [285]

Vancouver

van Gent P, Farah H, Nes NV, van Arem B. The Use of Persuasive In-Car Technology to Persuade Drivers at the Tactical Level. In Proceedings of the Road Safety and Simulation Conference: 17-19 October 2017, The Hague, Netherlands. 2017. 285

Author

van Gent, Paul ; Farah, Haneen ; Nes, Nicole Van ; van Arem, Bart. / The Use of Persuasive In-Car Technology to Persuade Drivers at the Tactical Level. Proceedings of the Road Safety and Simulation Conference: 17-19 October 2017, The Hague, Netherlands. 2017.

BibTeX

@inproceedings{dc53eb57551749d3a68b498b235f5f47,
title = "The Use of Persuasive In-Car Technology to Persuade Drivers at the Tactical Level",
abstract = "The use of in-car technology has become more prevalent, both as driver assistance systems as well as connectivity or entertainment systems. Driver assistance systems can be built-in, after-market or run on a smartphone. The challenge however, is to increase drivers’ compliance with these systems. Stimulating the driver to adopt certain behaviours over others is a growing area within driver assistance systems. These approaches have the potential to be very effective, but only when they attract or persuade road users to use it. This study has two main aims. The first, is to provide a review of the different approaches in the literature to influence driver behaviour using in-car technology. The second aim is to develop a conceptual model to guide the research efforts on influencing driver behaviour at the tactical level. A structured review was conducted exploring the literature available in the automotive, behavioural and traffic safety domains. First, we explored the available psychological models that describe behaviour and their applicability to the driving task. Following this, we investigated the methodological ways used to influence behaviour with a focus on the traffic domain. Finally, a conceptual model is presented which encompasses the behavioural basis, methods and techniques for influencing the behaviour using in-car technology and the strategic planning of behavioural change technology. The role of driver workload within the model is discussed. Possible applications using the composite model are discussed.",
author = "{van Gent}, Paul and Haneen Farah and Nes, {Nicole Van} and {van Arem}, Bart",
year = "2017",
language = "English",
booktitle = "Proceedings of the Road Safety and Simulation Conference",

}

RIS

TY - GEN

T1 - The Use of Persuasive In-Car Technology to Persuade Drivers at the Tactical Level

AU - van Gent, Paul

AU - Farah, Haneen

AU - Nes, Nicole Van

AU - van Arem, Bart

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - The use of in-car technology has become more prevalent, both as driver assistance systems as well as connectivity or entertainment systems. Driver assistance systems can be built-in, after-market or run on a smartphone. The challenge however, is to increase drivers’ compliance with these systems. Stimulating the driver to adopt certain behaviours over others is a growing area within driver assistance systems. These approaches have the potential to be very effective, but only when they attract or persuade road users to use it. This study has two main aims. The first, is to provide a review of the different approaches in the literature to influence driver behaviour using in-car technology. The second aim is to develop a conceptual model to guide the research efforts on influencing driver behaviour at the tactical level. A structured review was conducted exploring the literature available in the automotive, behavioural and traffic safety domains. First, we explored the available psychological models that describe behaviour and their applicability to the driving task. Following this, we investigated the methodological ways used to influence behaviour with a focus on the traffic domain. Finally, a conceptual model is presented which encompasses the behavioural basis, methods and techniques for influencing the behaviour using in-car technology and the strategic planning of behavioural change technology. The role of driver workload within the model is discussed. Possible applications using the composite model are discussed.

AB - The use of in-car technology has become more prevalent, both as driver assistance systems as well as connectivity or entertainment systems. Driver assistance systems can be built-in, after-market or run on a smartphone. The challenge however, is to increase drivers’ compliance with these systems. Stimulating the driver to adopt certain behaviours over others is a growing area within driver assistance systems. These approaches have the potential to be very effective, but only when they attract or persuade road users to use it. This study has two main aims. The first, is to provide a review of the different approaches in the literature to influence driver behaviour using in-car technology. The second aim is to develop a conceptual model to guide the research efforts on influencing driver behaviour at the tactical level. A structured review was conducted exploring the literature available in the automotive, behavioural and traffic safety domains. First, we explored the available psychological models that describe behaviour and their applicability to the driving task. Following this, we investigated the methodological ways used to influence behaviour with a focus on the traffic domain. Finally, a conceptual model is presented which encompasses the behavioural basis, methods and techniques for influencing the behaviour using in-car technology and the strategic planning of behavioural change technology. The role of driver workload within the model is discussed. Possible applications using the composite model are discussed.

UR - http://resolver.tudelft.nl/uuid:dc53eb57-5517-49d3-a68b-498b235f5f47

M3 - Conference contribution

BT - Proceedings of the Road Safety and Simulation Conference

ER -

ID: 22717570