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Wanting it all – public perceptions of the effectiveness, cost, and privacy of surveillance technology. / Cayford, Michelle; Pieters, Wolter; van Gelder, P. H.A.J.M.

In: Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, 2019.

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@article{1c9375ea5152451eb9724477f5769963,
title = "Wanting it all – public perceptions of the effectiveness, cost, and privacy of surveillance technology",
abstract = "Purpose: This study aims to explore how the public perceives the effectiveness of surveillance technology, and how people{\textquoteright}s views on privacy and their views on effectiveness are related. Likewise, it looks at the relation between perceptions of effectiveness and opinions on the acceptable cost of surveillance technology. Design/methodology/approach: For this study, surveys of Dutch students and their parents were conducted over three consecutive years. Findings: A key finding of this paper is that the public does not engage in a trade-off neither with regard to privacy-effectiveness (exchanging more effectiveness for less privacy and vice versa) nor with effectiveness-cost, but rather expects all three elements to be achieved simultaneously. This paper also found that the correlation between perceived effectiveness and perceived privacy was stronger for parents than for students. Research limitations/implications: Participants for this study were exclusively in The Netherlands. Survey questions on the effectiveness of surveillance technology focused on one type of technology, and on private mobile device use in two scenarios. Social implications: The public{\textquoteright}s perceptions of the effectiveness of surveillance technology potentially influence its acceptance of the technology, which, in turn, can affect the legitimacy and use of the technology. Originality/value: Within the much-discussed privacy-security debate lies a less-heard debate – that of the effectiveness of the surveillance technology in question. The public is one actor in this debate. This study examines the public{\textquoteright}s perceptions of this less-heard debate.",
keywords = "Cost, Effectiveness, Privacy, Public views, Surveillance, Surveillance technology",
author = "Michelle Cayford and Wolter Pieters and {van Gelder}, {P. H.A.J.M.}",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1108/JICES-11-2018-0087",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society",
issn = "1477-996X",
publisher = "Emerald Publishing",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Wanting it all – public perceptions of the effectiveness, cost, and privacy of surveillance technology

AU - Cayford, Michelle

AU - Pieters, Wolter

AU - van Gelder, P. H.A.J.M.

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Purpose: This study aims to explore how the public perceives the effectiveness of surveillance technology, and how people’s views on privacy and their views on effectiveness are related. Likewise, it looks at the relation between perceptions of effectiveness and opinions on the acceptable cost of surveillance technology. Design/methodology/approach: For this study, surveys of Dutch students and their parents were conducted over three consecutive years. Findings: A key finding of this paper is that the public does not engage in a trade-off neither with regard to privacy-effectiveness (exchanging more effectiveness for less privacy and vice versa) nor with effectiveness-cost, but rather expects all three elements to be achieved simultaneously. This paper also found that the correlation between perceived effectiveness and perceived privacy was stronger for parents than for students. Research limitations/implications: Participants for this study were exclusively in The Netherlands. Survey questions on the effectiveness of surveillance technology focused on one type of technology, and on private mobile device use in two scenarios. Social implications: The public’s perceptions of the effectiveness of surveillance technology potentially influence its acceptance of the technology, which, in turn, can affect the legitimacy and use of the technology. Originality/value: Within the much-discussed privacy-security debate lies a less-heard debate – that of the effectiveness of the surveillance technology in question. The public is one actor in this debate. This study examines the public’s perceptions of this less-heard debate.

AB - Purpose: This study aims to explore how the public perceives the effectiveness of surveillance technology, and how people’s views on privacy and their views on effectiveness are related. Likewise, it looks at the relation between perceptions of effectiveness and opinions on the acceptable cost of surveillance technology. Design/methodology/approach: For this study, surveys of Dutch students and their parents were conducted over three consecutive years. Findings: A key finding of this paper is that the public does not engage in a trade-off neither with regard to privacy-effectiveness (exchanging more effectiveness for less privacy and vice versa) nor with effectiveness-cost, but rather expects all three elements to be achieved simultaneously. This paper also found that the correlation between perceived effectiveness and perceived privacy was stronger for parents than for students. Research limitations/implications: Participants for this study were exclusively in The Netherlands. Survey questions on the effectiveness of surveillance technology focused on one type of technology, and on private mobile device use in two scenarios. Social implications: The public’s perceptions of the effectiveness of surveillance technology potentially influence its acceptance of the technology, which, in turn, can affect the legitimacy and use of the technology. Originality/value: Within the much-discussed privacy-security debate lies a less-heard debate – that of the effectiveness of the surveillance technology in question. The public is one actor in this debate. This study examines the public’s perceptions of this less-heard debate.

KW - Cost

KW - Effectiveness

KW - Privacy

KW - Public views

KW - Surveillance

KW - Surveillance technology

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85071697217&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1108/JICES-11-2018-0087

DO - 10.1108/JICES-11-2018-0087

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85071697217

JO - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society

JF - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society

SN - 1477-996X

ER -

ID: 62455943